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This section contains a recent sampling of articles and announcements from the retail trade press, illustrating the growing acceptance of JavaPOS-based solutions for the retail industry.

Article: May 2004 - The POS That Refreshes

Taking advantage of an open, standards-based approach to point-of-sale (POS) applications lets retailers increase accuracy and reduce costs in this critical informational link in the value chain.

http://www.sun.com/solutions/documents/articles/RE_pos_refresh_AA.xml


Article: August 2003 - Justifying Java

A Q&A discussion about how Java fits into retail POS today, and where retail technology is heading tomorrow.

http://www.ismretail.com/Articles/2003_08/030802.htm


Article: June 2003 - Linux goes Ka-Ching

Linux is making cash registers ring, and not just for Red Hat Inc., SuSE Linux AG and other distributors of the open-source operating system.

Retailers of all sizes are investigating the use of Linux on POS, or point-of-sale, systems to provide some flexibility in their software deployments and lower operating costs by avoiding licensing fees. Cost savings is crucial in the world of retail, where life is lived on razor-thin margins.

http://www.eweek.com/print_article/0,3668,a=43105,00.asp


Article: March 2003 -
Java POS: Lower TCO And Better Performance

Just about any technology adoption trend has cost savings as part of its raison d'etre nowadays. Most of the time, users have to deploy a technology for up to three years before they can experience the breakeven point. But, for retailers that are rolling out Java-based POS solutions in new stores, it's not uncommon to realize 30% savings right away compared to rolling out non-Java-based POS solutions.

After you consider all the fringe benefits that come with Java, you'll see why many retailers - from small to large - are going with this new technology.

http://www.ismretail.com/articles/2003_03/030307.htm


Article: March 2003 -
Shipments of Linux-Based POS Systems Increased 185% in 2002

The number of retail point-of-sale Terminals running Linux in North America increased 185% in 2002 according to a new study released today.

POS vendors are adopting an "OS Agnostic" approach to their base POS units so that retailers have a wide choice in their POS decisions.

http://www.executivetechnology.com/sitesearch2.cfm?ID=6172&term=POS


Article: JANUARY 2003 -
Retailers scope out JavaPOS systems

Growing numbers of retailers are scoping out Java-based point-of-sale (POS) systems as one option to replace their aging cash registers.

Several retailers that are either deploying or piloting Java POS systems said they like the fact that the software can run on any hardware or operating system and also noted that they're finding the code easy to modify as their needs expand. Some also reported decreases in implementation and support costs, depending on the additional systems choices they have made.

http://www.computerworld.com/industrytopics/retail/story/0,10801,77892,00.html


Article: January 2003 -
Retailers explore JavaPOS systems

Growing numbers of retailers are scoping out Java-based point-of-sale (POS) systems as one option to replace their aging cash registers.

Several retailers that are either deploying or piloting Java POS systems said they like the fact that the software can run on any hardware or operating system and also noted that they're finding the code easy to modify as their needs expand. Some also reported decreases in implementation and support costs, depending on the additional systems choices they have made.

http://computerworld.com/industrytopics/retail/story/0,10801,77892,00.html


Announcement: February 2003 -
New JavaPOS deployment on Linux POS Terminals

First Major Implementation of Linux in Grocery Delivers Low Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and Speeds Customers Through Checkout Lines.

Supermarket chain Hannaford Bros. of Scarborough, Maine recently installed a Linux-based point of sale system from Retalix. Hannaford is the latest in a trend of retailers turning to Linux for their POS terminals.

http://www.nwfusion.com/newsletters/linux/2003/0217linux1.html


Announcement: September 25, 2002

Regal Cinemas is now serving up popcorn, candy and drinks to moviegoers using 3,500 new Linux-based point-of-sale (POS) terminals that are being installed in 536 theaters around the nation.

Todd King, vice president of technical information services at Regal, said the company knew it wanted its next generation of POS systems to run with Java-based applications that could be custom-built for concession stands, including inventory and full sales capabilities.

http://www.computerworld.com/softwaretopics/os/linux/story/0,10801,74568,00.html


Announcement: July 2002

To help achieve their vision of providing excellent customer service Gap Inc. choses to implementation a chain-wide Java-Based POS solution.

Plans are to begin deployment of the technology to all Gap, Banana Republic and Old Navy stores globally.

http://www.computerworld.com/softwaretopics/os/linux/story/0,10801,74568,00.html


Announcement: June 2002

Burlington Coat Factory plans to install 1,400 Java POS appliances to support the fall new store openings. By the end of this fiscal year, approximately half of Burlington Coat Factory's POS registers will be JavaPOS systems; Burlington plans to continue upgrading the rest of its 300-plus stores in 2003.

http://www.wincor-nixdorf.com/internet/us/NewsEvents/press/020625BCFRenewal/
BCFRenewalRelease,templateId=BusinessCategoryPressDetail.jsp.html



Announcement: April 2002

Mark's Work Wearhouse, a 320 store Canadian clothing chain, will begin deploying thin client JavaPOS Solutions.

The Men's Wearhouse will continue to deploy JavaPOS terminals in a thin-client point-of-service store architecture. We're running 500 stores with real time links to our home office applications," said Jeff Marshall, Chief Information Officer with The Men's Wearhouse. "By hosting more data and business logic centrally, we continue to leverage our investment in IT infrastructure."

http://industry.java.sun.com/javanews/stories/story2/0,1072,44664,00.html


Announcement: January 2002

The Home Depot is set to launch a pilot of its new point-of-sale JavaPOS-based system, which replaces four sales applications the company now maintains in about 1,300 stores. "Its component-based design will take business changes more easily than packaged applications", said Ray Allen, senior IS manager at The Home Depot.

The core of The Home Depot's development strategy is to use XML for defining the data shared between applications, while using Web services technology to break up these monolithic applications into reusable Java components.

http://industry.java.sun.com/javanews/stories/story2/0,1072,42081,00.html


Article: November 2001

An examination of an open-source POS application written in Java that exhttp://industry.java.sun.com/javanews/stories/story2/0,1072,42081,00.html


Article: November 2001

An examination of an open-source POS application written in Java that explains the applicability of specific Java language functionality to the problems faced in developing retail POS applications.

http://www.linuxdevices.com/articles/AT2770406717.html


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